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Lussia Wellness Group

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Kate Bush - Sat In Your Lap



According to Kate, "The video was filmed over two days, one part at a video studio, the other at the audio studios. The former provided the quick, easy technical sides to be performed, the latter provided the space and presence. The large parquet floor was to be a feature, and Abbey Road's past, full of dancing and singing spirits, was to be conjured up in the present day by tapping feet to the sound of jungle drums - only to be turned into past again through the wonder of video-tape. The shots were sorted into a logical order: all long shots were audio studio, all others were video studio. A storyboard was drawn up and was very closely worked to, being hung on the wall on days of shootings. The editing was a long, difficult job, as it was comprised of many sections which had to be edited together (just like the big musical one). The editor worked all day and into the next morning with great skill and patience, and only when someone told us did we find out it had been his birthday and he'd worked it all away. One of the exciting things about making the video was the "accessories" we used, such as the lovely costumes and props. The jerk-jacket which we used in 'Army Dreamers' was used again for a short sequence, and although there's a silver wire, it feels like flying. Out of the harness and into the light of a timeless tunnel, as a little magician's box springs to life and the room is filled with laser and skaters."




Kate Bush - Sat In Your Lap



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IED recently said something to the effect that "sat in your lap hasmore than you can comfortably absorb in three minutes" in opposition to astatement that ran something like "it was too short for three minutes..."


Regarding the SIYL drum track, the basic debate that Damian and I are havingis: are the huge pounding drum sounds we hear produced by a real person really hitting huge drums with real sticks, or are they sampled sounds being played viathe Fairlight? I'm fairly sure its the former. There may be vestigial traces ofthe Roland tinkle-bonk in there somewhere, but those are not the focus of ourinterest. Thanks for your comments, however. Jon Drukman